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dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Eileenes_ES
dc.contributor.authorLaserson, Kayla Fes_ES
dc.contributor.authorWells, Charles Des_ES
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Marisaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T14:52:58Z
dc.date.available2015-08-25T14:52:58Z
dc.date.issued2004es_ES
dc.identifier.citationSchneider, Eileen,Laserson, Kayla F,Wells, Charles D,Moore, Marisa (2004) Tuberculosis along the United States-Mexico border, 1993-2001. Rev Panam Salud Publica;16(1) 23-34,jul. 2004. Retrieved from http://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1020-49892004000700004es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1020-49892004000700004es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://iris.paho.org/handle/10665.2/8213
dc.format.extentiluses_ES
dc.format.extenttabes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRev Panam Salud Publica;16(1),jul. 2004es_ES
dc.subjectMycobacterium tuberculosises_ES
dc.subjectTuberculosept_BR
dc.subjectTuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentoses_ES
dc.subjectAntituberculososes_ES
dc.subjectMigração Internacionalpt_BR
dc.subjectCooperação Internacionalpt_BR
dc.subjectMexicoes_ES
dc.subjectTuberculosept_BR
dc.subjectTuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentoses_ES
dc.subjectEstados Unidoses_ES
dc.titleTuberculosis along the United States-Mexico border, 1993-2001es_ES
dc.typeJournal articlesen_US
dc.rights.holderPan American Health Organizationen_US
dc.description.notesOBJECTIVES: Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading public health problem and a recognized priority for the federal Governments of both Mexico and the United States of America. The objectives of this research, primarily for the four states in the United States that are along the border with Mexico, were to: (1) describe the epidemiological situation of TB, (2) identify TB risk factors, and (3) discuss tuberculosis program strategies. METHODS: We analyzed tuberculosis case reports collected from 1993 through 2001 by the tuberculosis surveillance system of the United States. We used those data to compare TB cases mainly among three groups: (1) Mexican-born persons in the four United States border states (Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas), (2) persons in those four border states who had been born in the United States, and (3) Mexican-born persons in the 46 other states of the United States, which do not border Mexico. RESULTS: For the period from 1993 through 2001, of the 16 223 TB cases reported for Mexican-born persons in the United States, 12 450 of them (76.7 percent) were reported by Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. In those four border states overall in 2001, tuberculosis case rates for Mexican-born persons were 5.0 times as high as the rates for persons born in the United States; those four states have 23 counties that directly border on Mexico, and the ratio in those counties was 5.8. HIV seropositivity, drug and alcohol use, unemployment, and incarceration were significantly less likely to be reported in Mexican-born TB patients from the four border states and the nonborder states than in patients born in the United States from the four border states (P 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that among pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were 18-64 years of age and residing in the four border states, the Mexican-born patients were 3.6 times as likely as the United States-born patients were to have resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampin (i.e., to have multidrug-resistant TB) and twice as likely to have isoniazid resistance. Mexican-born TB patients from the four border states and the nonborder states were significantly more likely to have moved or to be lost to follow-up than were the TB patients born in the United States from the four border states (P 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Increased... (AU)pt_BR


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