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dc.date.accessioned2023
dc.date.available2023
dc.date.issued2024es
dc.identifier.isbnISBN: 978-92-75-12793-3 (PDF)es
dc.identifier.isbnISBN: 978-92-75-12794-0 (Print version)es
dc.identifier.urihttps://iris.paho.org/handle/10665.2/58106
dc.description.abstractIn recent decades, a significant improvement in people’s general health conditions has occurred, leading to an increase in life expectancy at birth in most countries in the Region of the Americas. This progress has been the result of both health technology advances – antibiotics, vaccines, and other treatments – and improvements in the conditions in which people live, including increased access to improved drinking water and sanitation, and health services. Nevertheless, progress has slowed in recent years, and achievements have varied among countries and territories, as well as within them. In the journey toward universal health, it is essential to have the ability to monitor and assess progress in terms of the ultimate goal of health systems: improving the health and well-being of populations. To this end, this edition of Health in the Americas analyzes the standardized rate of potentially avoidable premature mortality as an indicator of health system performance, considering both its preventable component through public and intersectoral health interventions, as well as the treatable component, related to the effectiveness of health services, that is, the quality of health care. The analysis of potentially avoidable premature mortality provides a metric for comparing and tracking performance over time. This analytical tool plays a crucial role in holding health systems accountable in the Region of the Americas. Furthermore, the analysis of potentially avoidable premature mortality highlights the importance of investing not only in healthcare services but also in addressing the broader social and environmental determinants of health. This approach is fundamental to ensuring equity in health outcomes across countries. By recognizing the significance of these determinants, countries can develop comprehensive strategies that encompass not only health care but also social policies aimed at reducing inequalities and improving overall population health.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPAHOen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo/*
dc.subjectAmericasen_US
dc.titleHealth in the Americas: Potentially avoidable premature mortalityen_US
dc.typePublicationsen_US
dc.rights.holderPan American Health Organizationen_US
dc.contributor.corporatenamePan American Health Organizationen_US
paho.isfeatured0en_US
paho.publisher.countryUnited Statesen_US
paho.publisher.cityWashington, D.C.en_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.37774/9789275127933
paho.source.centercodeUS1.1en_US
paho.relation.languageVersion10665.2/59251en
paho.contributor.departmentEvidence and Intelligence for Action in Health (EIH)en_US
paho.iswhotranslationNoen_US


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This notice should be preserved along with the article's original URL.Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO